Southern Red Oak

This is a handsome, long-lived, large shade tree that gets its name from the rust-colored hairs along its twigs. It grows in dry, loamy soils in uplands and in mixed forests. The wood is heavy, hard, strong, coarse-grained; used for fence posts, fuel and general construction.

Quercus falcata, commonly known as the Southern Red Oak or Spanish Oak, is a tree native to the southeastern United States. It occurs on dry or sandy upland sites from southern New York (Long Island) south to central Florida and west to southern Missouri and eastern Texas.
 
It is a deciduous tree reaching 82-98 feet tall, rarely 115-125 feet (forest grown specimens on highly productive sites), with a trunk up to 5 feet in diameter. The leaves are 4-12 in. long and 2-6 in, wide, with 3 to 5 sharply pointed, often curved, bristle-tipped lobes, the central lobe long and narrow; the small number of long, narrow lobes is diagnostic, readily distinguishing Southern Red Oak from other red oaks. They are dark green and shiny above, and rusty and hairy below. The seed is a short acorn 1/2 inch long, bright orange-brown, enclosed for 1/3 to ½ half of its length in a flat cup. The acorn matures at the end of its second season. The bark is dark brownish gray with narrow, shallow ridges.
Southern Red Oak


Southern Red Oak Bark
Southern Red Oak Leaf                          Southern Red Oak Twig

References:

1. "Quercus Falcata." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 16 Sept. 2012. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_falcata

2. Seiler, John; Jenson, Edward; Alex Niemiera; Peterson, John; "Quercus Falcata Fact Sheet." Quercus Falcata Fact Sheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech University at: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=68

3. Seiler, John; Jenson, Edward; Alex Niemiera; Peterson, John; "Quercus Falcata Fact Sheet." Digital Images. Quercus Falcata Fact Sheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech University retrieved from: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=68