Darlington Oak

This semi-evergreen tree was 1st discovered by Bartram on his walk through Georgia. It has found favor aDarlington Oaks a 
street tree in many cities of the South and because of its smaller size and rapid growth it is a good choice for residential landscapes. New leaves push off old leaves in spring. The acorns take 18 months to mature.

Quercus hemisphaerica (Darlington oak, Sand laurel oak, Laurel oak, Laurel-leaf oak) is a species of oak native to the Southeastern United States. It is a medium-sized evergreen to semi-evergreen tree which can grow as tall as 115 feet tall with a 5-foot trunk diameter, although it is more commonly around 60 to 65 feet tall. This tardily deciduous and relatively short-lived native tree (it reaches maturity at approximately 50 years and lives for 70–90 years) is found from Virginia south to Florida and west to Texas.Darlington Oak Twig

This fast-growing tree is a great year-round shade tree that has a denser canopy in the spring and summer months. However, care should be taken when planting this tree near a house since it becomes susceptible to disease and rot with maturity. Like all other oaks, the leaves and acorns of this tree have a high tannin content that can stain concrete. 

The bark is initially smooth, and gray-brown, becoming darker and more rigid and furrowed (more deeply grooved) with maturity. The thin but leathery-textured leaves are 1 to 5 inches long. The leaves are narrow with smooth margins or edges and generally exhibit a pointed
 tip (that often falls off late in the season). Edges may be rolled. The top side of the leaf is dark green and the underside is bright green. Acorns are small (1/2 inch
Darlington Oak
 or less), dark brown with some fuzz and a grayish cup that covers about 1/3 of the nut, and mature in two years. Male flowers are yellow-green long catkins (1 1/2 to 3 inches long), females are green to reddish, very small spike in leaf axils, appearing with the leaves.

All members of this genus produce large amounts of pollen, making both deciduous and evergreen oaks highly to extremely allergenic.

While Darlington oak has limited commercial value, it is commonly used as firewood and pulpwood, and for large drag mats or other heavy-use timbers. 

The Darlington oak is a great food source for many species of wildlife, especially since it regularly produces abundant amounts of acorns.

Darlington Oak Trunk Darlington Oak Leaves

References:


1. "Quercus Hemisphaerica." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 07 Jan. 2012. Web. 19 Sept 2012. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_hemisphaerica

2. Seiler, John; Jensen, Edward; Niemiera, Alex; & Peterson, John. “Darlington Oak”. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. 2012. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Retrieved from: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=241
 
3. Seiler, John; Jensen, Edward; Niemiera, Alex; & Peterson, John. “Darlington Oak”. (2012) Digital Images. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Retrieved from: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=241
 
4. Darlington Oak. (2010). University of Florida IFAS Extension. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. Retrieved from: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr301